4200DTNS

 

 

For some reason, printer manufacturers have never put a lot of effort into naming their machines. It would be refreshing to see someone like Brother or HP roll out a new model called 'The Inkredible' or 'Colourama', but no - it's always DCP this and 3800DN that. How boring.

 

But have you ever wondered what those names might mean? A quick browse through our toner cartridge range will throw up a mind-boggling variety of acronyms and suffixes, but unless you're already a printing expert, it's probably all greek to you. What, for example, is the difference between an HP LaserJet 3500 and an HP LaserJet 3500n

 

In today's blog, we're going to explain what some of those letters stand for. Note that different manufacturers use different nomenclature, so this information will vary between brands; still, most of these are reasonably universal:

 

  • D is for Duplexing: This printer is capable of double-sided printing.

  • L is...a tricky one. It can denote a low-speed printer (although this is more commonly written as LS); bizarrely, HP have also been known to use it to denote a stapler function (see S).

  • M means that this printer has PostScript capabilities. Not to be confused with...

  • MFP is for Multi-Fucntion Printer: This printer also functions as a scanner, photocopier, etc.

  • is for Network: This printer is network-ready, meaning that multiple printers can connect to it at once. Non-network printers must be plugged into the computer you're printing from.

  • is for Stapler or Stacker: This printer has a built-in stapling function...or a paper stacker for large jobs. Not to be confused with...

  • SE is for Special Edition: This printer was marketed as a 'special' version of a previous model. Note that this doesn't refer to any specific features or functions.

  • Si is used by Hewlett-Packard to denote high-volume printers.

  • T is for Tray: This printer has an additional paper tray.

  • is for Wireless: Printer can connect to the network wirelessly (as opposed to printers, which have to be physically connected to the network).

  • X is used to denote that this printer has several different features - it looks a bit cleaner than DTNSL, after all!

Did we miss any? If you're still not sure what that model name means, why not get in touch?